writing

5 TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR WRITING

Hello, my dear readers!

As promised, today’s post is going to revolve around our favorite topic… WRITING!!! 

The past few months have been heavily devoted to life updates, poems, and musings, so it is about time for some source material on this blog, and that is the art of writing!

The truth is that we as writers should always strive to build our craft. While some people have a natural knack for words, there is still so much behind this skill that must be carefully maintained in order to persuade and inspire an audience. Therefore, we must remember to be patient and implement these upcoming five tips in our art.

Without further ado, let’s hit the list!


1. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT

No literary great became great overnight.

This is inevitably one of the most important tips on this list, because you must practice your writing in order to improve. As a student pilot, I couldn’t just hop in an airplane and expect to know how to get off the ground… And even if I did get off the ground, what about the landing? Maybe this isn’t the best example, but I hope it hits you a little bit in the heart. We must recognize that we are students of words.

Here is something I want you to think on: What was your first story? What was your first poem? Your first journal entry? What about song? Or whatever your method of writing is? Now think about why you wrote that. How did you write it? What were you trying to say? What insights did you want to give to the world?

You’re also probably thinking: What the heck was that trash? And that’s okay! You can be proud of your first work, but the truth is that there’s probably a lot you would change if you could. And that means you’re doing what you should be doing: Practicing.

So, what exactly does practicing entail? Well, you’ve gotta sit down, ignore the world around you, and get to work. You have to be willing to commit to your art, and stick to it. If something isn’t working, figure it out. As you write more and more, you will develop your own methodical approach of writing and editing (which should arguably take longer than the actual writing process, if we’re being honest). And there is a great feeling when you’ve got your ritual of writing down.

What’s even greater than that?

Seeing how far you’ve grown.


2. FOCUS ON GRAMMAR

Some of us are grammar nerds, and others aren’t. I fall into the first category. One of the first things I notice about anything is how grammatically strong it is. If there are countless errors, I’m probably going to grow a little agitated. Why is that?

Well, when I pay for a book, I expect it to be the perfect copy of what was once the writer’s surreal conception. If I’m going to toss fifteen bucks to the industry, I want to know that I’ve paid for something borne from hard work and creative beauty.

Maybe you’re not the same, but I’m going to ask you to consider this point carefully then. Your audience will know whether you put the time and effort into your manuscript, and one of the tell-tale signs is through grammar. For example, my mom is a grammar fiend who will pick apart any of my works. While this can be frustrating, I know that she is coming at my work with an analytical mind, and that’s a good thing. When we write for an audience, we’re writing for people who don’t necessarily think like us. And if you want to impress your writers, you need to know how to write effectively.

So, how do you know if your grammar is satisfactory? Some websites I have used in the past include these:

We live in the technological age. Do not be afraid to use online programs, spellcheckers, and your friends to help you with grammar. Nobody’s perfect, but we must humble ourselves and seek advice when it comes to our writing. How else will we improve?

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Editing on a random Uruguayan beach.  (February 2018)

3. USE YOUR AUDIENCE

All right. How could we talk about improving our writing without a shoutout to the people for whom we’re writing?

We writers are selfish (or maybe it’s just me). I’ll admit it: I write as if I’m the main character. Some of my characters are actually based on people I know. Some plot points are borrowed from real life.

But guess what? Your stories aren’t going to sell if you don’t have a mind for your audience.

Maybe you’re the kind of person who is just writing for yourself. Maybe you will never publish anything. However, a lot of you guys are bloggers, and that means you are publishing things. The truth is that you must have a knowledge and appreciation of your fanbase, because there are people who will be reading and analyzing your materials. And if you want your audience to like you, you must be willing to write for them.

What I mean is that if you want to write beauty advice posts, then your target audience has to be the people who are interested in your topic. So leave Easter Eggs for them! Write posts and see how they respond. If they’re not super interested in certain aspects of what you’re producing, check in and see what else they’d like to see from you. Your audience knows when you’re invested in what you write, and they’ll be more likely to invest in you as a result.


4. READ UNTIL YOU CAN READ NO MORE

When I was in elementary school, I remember telling my teacher, “Yeah, I love writing so much, but I hate reading.” While that was most definitely a lie, and who knows why I said that, it is simply a law of the universe that a writer must read in order to improve his or her craft.

Although I do believe a writer’s style has unique elements, I also know that we develop our styles through the writers we read. We borrow aspects we enjoy and toss what we hate into our mental trash cans. When we read thousands of works in various genres, we learn what works for the audience and what doesn’t.

If you want to write commercial fiction, study the masters like King, Grisham, and Steel. You may not like their writing techniques (I certainly do not like Danielle Steel), but they’ve become super successful for a reason. If you’re invested in poetry, study the different forms and practice your own. If you want to write songs, you have to study what goes into songwriting, and study through those who have done it in the past.

Plus, if you want to make it big, you have to know the environment. You get a better picture of the environment when you know what’s selling best right now. If you don’t care about making it big, you should still aim to improve your writing. So don’t make excuses; start reading.

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Read random books with your pig if you need to. Actually, I do not recommend this. Who knows what kind of blue waves my poor pig was exposed to?!? (Tennessee // 2016)

5. WRITE FROM THE HEART

Others will argue with me on this one, and that’s okay. While this list is in no particular order, I believe that the biggest tip to improve your writing is to write from your own heart. 

You have your voice–and no one else’s. That is why people will be drawn to what you produce. And, as I’ve stated previously, your audience will recognize when you are writing from your heart (or not).

What does this even mean then?

Think of the most beautiful song you’ve ever heard in your life. What makes it beautiful? The notes, certainly, but it’s also the build-up of emotionality behind it. I will never forget hours and hours of dissecting piano music and learning the hardest songs I’ve ever played. While I would hit every note with precision from all the practice, my one-of-a-kind teacher, Mrs. Xu-Peppers, would shake her head and say, “But you aren’t playing with your heart.”

What? I was sixteen, my fingers flying across those keys, and my teacher was still disappointed? But then I got it: There is more to music than the notes. Like she wisely said, I had to learn to play with my heart, because only then would I understand what the music was saying to me and to my audience.

Writing is the same exact thing. You can write like a pro, but if you’re not writing from your heart, then you’re going to fall flat. You have to write things that matter to you. You have to write with honesty and convey your unique perspective of the world. You must be willing to share the raw side of you, so that we can gain understanding from the emotions that flow through your blood.

How do you do this?

Write as if you’ve only got one day left on Earth to live. Write as if your life depends on it. Write as if you’ll never get the chance again.

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Though I wanted a picture that relates to writing, I found this old pic of a baby alpaca that I think can represent us writers. At first we’re skinny, confused, whatever… But eventually we will grow into who we are meant to be. Random musings, I know. (Memphis, TN // September 2017)

GET TO WRITING, GUYS!

My hope is that you guys have taken some of these tips to heart. While I’m blabbing away on this topic, I definitely feel convicted by some of the tips listed above, and I will try to implement them more in my own writing life. Never forget that none of us is perfect, and that’s probably why we’re all on these blogs, so that we can share our experiences and learn from others. 🙂

The point of this post is to encourage you. You have so many opportunities, so use them! Forget the insecurities in your head, and get to work. You’ve got an audience waiting to hear from you. ❤

Keep me updated on your goals and writing life. I am super excited to hear from you.

Until next time,

-K. ❤

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It doesn’t matter where you write, as long as you enjoy what you are producing. (Please ignore my creepy shadow.) (Tennessee // June 2019)
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46 thoughts on “5 TIPS TO IMPROVE YOUR WRITING”

  1. I lived with the OWL at Purdue always up when I was working on my degrees. It’s the one website I always tell people to go when they tell me they’re struggling with writing, it’s such a great resource!!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. This is indeed very inspiring. I will wait for more of your learnings from your experiences in writing. I’m sure you’ll get a lot of insights for being a passionate writer. I really appreciate your effort in extending your help to us. In this post, you definitely wrote from the heart.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Readers can definitely tell whether your work is rushed or carefully crafted.

    After so much practice writing and editing you develop a very special skill that I can’t really explain.

    You can read a passage and just *know* it’s not up to par. So you look for an approach to fix it.

    You come in from all different angles and try to figure out how to make it all fit.

    To figure it out you have to let the work “speak to you”. Then you try writing it out in different ways.

    You want to get it *just* right.

    And when that happens you just *know* it’s done.

    Honestly, I wish I had the patience for that. I usually publish before the work is truly finished 🥴

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wow, thank you so much for the thoughtful response!! You are absolutely right in your observations. Sometimes we writers forget that we’re not just writing for ourselves—we’re writing for an audience, and that can be detrimental. I know I tend to rush through things instead of taking a breath, remembering to edit, and go from there.

      But you’ve definitely got some good advice I will be implementing. Thank you!! 💜💜💕💜💜

      Like

  4. Hi! These writing tips were very helpful! I have written a musical. I am really excited about writing the next play. I have allowed some friends of mine to read my musical, and they loved it. I hope to get it to where I can have it performed. I’ll keep you posted. Thanks so much for your TIPS.

    coni

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I just like the helpful information you provide for your articles. I’ll bookmark your blog and check once more right here frequently. I am slightly certain I will learn lots of new stuff right right here! Best of luck for the following!

    Like

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